Embrace UK Research Projects
The Community REACH project

Antenatal care is the first step in providing maternity services to pregnant women. It is recommended that antenatal care begins early in pregnancy so that women can get the full benefits from care and be supported to have a healthy pregnancy and birth.

The first appointment with the maternity service for antenatal care is referred to as the ‘booking appointment’. It involves a health check and information on screening tests, nutrition, and exercise.

This first appointment is also important for identifying women who may need additional medical or social support in pregnancy.

The ‘Community REACH’ project aims to support women to have their first antenatal appointment with maternity services by the 12th week of pregnancy, in line with national guidelines. Click here for full one-page summary.

This project encompasses the Noel Park area.

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Embrace UK Research Project - Who was involved?

Embrace UK Community Support Centre (Embrace UK) formerly known as Ethiopian Community Centre in the UK (ECCUK) and the Research Centre for Transcultural Studies in Health, Middlesex University, were collaborating on this important study in 1999. Both have combined expertise in carrying out research with marginalised communities particularly those from minority ethnic groups and have active involvement and contact with the wide range of policy makers and service providers in the field of health and social welfare.


SAFER UK

"Seeking to prevent sexual abuse and sexual assault of child asylum seekers in the UK"

The SAFER UK Project was a research project being undertaken by The Research Centre for Transcultural Studies in Health, Middlesex University, and The Embrace UK Community Support Centre.

What were the aims and objectives of the study?

The aims of this study were to:

  • develop an in-depth understanding of the specific vulnerabilities of unaccompanied refugee minors to sexual abuse and sexual assault
  • to identify the weaknesses in the current system for prevention, detection and treatment
  • and to determine how these systems can be strengthened and made more culturally appropriate

Why was the project needed?

In January 2001 the total number of refugee children supported by local authorities was 6078 (Home Office, 2001). There was a need to improve the existing knowledge among those who have responsibility (including policy makers, social and health care practitioners and police) for unaccompanied child refugees, regarding the vulnerability of this group to child sexual abuse and assault.

We produced a list of counselling agencies for participants to seek counselling from if they wish. Participants can request help from the project to pay fees. Please click on the link below and view the list of counselling agencies:

SAFER UK Booklets for Young People

More information about SAFER UK and the Executive Summary can be downloaded here below